Shifting Gears for Racial Justice

Following five years of targeted grantmaking designed to build the capacity of a field of Muslim, Arab and South Asian (MASA) organizations and strengthen civil rights protections in a national security context, the SRC is now moving forward with a renewed strategy – one that is more directly aligned with the natural trajectory of the field and serves to integrate these issues and communities into the broader rights movement.

Making Black Lives Matter Initiative Website Launch

The Making Black Lives Matter Initiative site will provide background on Hill-Snowdon’s MBLM Initiative that is focused on supporting Black-led organizing in order to help revitalize and strengthen the institutional and political power of the Black community. The website describes Foundation’s framework for supporting Black communities to develop the power necessary for them to thrive and introduces the Black Social Change Funders Network as a vehicle to help philanthropy better coordinate its efforts to achieve social change in the Black community.

Philanthropy on the Frontlines of Ferguson

Brown’s death at the hands of former Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson sparked a national dialogue about racial inequality. It brought home the point that, just as place and poverty are social determinants of health, racial equity is an important indicator of our communities’ health. This dialogue has been a critically important step toward addressing the complex challenges and deep fissures that exist in communities plagued by racial tension and economic instability. But we at Deaconess Foundation strongly believe that in order to overcome these challenges and heal the fissures, the dialogue must be followed by action on a systemic level.

We didn’t start a movement. We started a network.

by Patrisse Marie Cullors-Brignac - ...And as we inch closer to liberation, we will do so in different ways, and it is important to note the differences in how we approach this important work. As a friend of mine recently said: “there’s no one right way to get free.” There are divergent strategies, however, and it feels especially important to point out two in particular: neoliberalism and Black radicalism.

Who Pays? The True Cost of Incarceration on Families

Who Pays? The True Cost of Incarceration on Families proves that the costs of locking up millions of people is much deeper than we think. Locking up individuals also breaks apart their families and communities, saddles them with overwhelming debt, and leads to mental and physical ailments. The situation is dire, but a better approach is possible.

Moving Money, Making Change: Funding the Movement for Black Lives

As a professional grantmaker, grassroots philanthropist and lifelong activist, it was a privilege to be in this intergenerational space filled with Black families, movement elders, high school activists, young nonprofit leaders, formerly incarcerated people, differently abled participants, fellow funders and old and new friends...Many still hesitate to support the organizers and activists at the heart of the movement. Funders looking to do more should consider three things.

What We’ve Gained And Lost Since Stonewall

People can’t get to Laverne Cox or Janet Mock, so instead, they go after a girl walking in a street in her neighborhood at night, just trying to make money to survive. And when the police come, the murderer goes home free of charge, while this trans woman nobody cares about lies dead in the street.