Analysis and Reports2020-12-08T00:58:47+00:00

FFJ Advisor Discussion Series: Mary Hooks

Funders for Justice interviews Mary Hooks,  Co-Director of Southerners on New Ground (SONG) and a leader of the National Bail Out. We asked Mary to tell us about a recent win on bail reform with the Atlanta city council, what visionary organizing looks like, and what funders can do in this moment. 

February 21st, 2018|

FFJ Advisor Blog Series: Zachary Norris

Zachary Norris, the Executive Director of the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights, provides insight on the current political climate, Ella Baker Center's work and connection national movements, and ways funders can support social change and transformation.

November 9th, 2017|

No Pride in Deportation: From Vice to ICE Toolkit

BreakOUT! and NOWCRJ’s Congress of Day Laborers recently released the Vice to ICE Toolkit, a resource on organizing across intersections of identities, including race, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, country of origin, and language.

June 30th, 2017|

For Philanthropy, Time to Double Down to End Injustice

Foundations and other nonprofits are grappling with the consequences of change for our collective future, especially as we have witnessed how deep a grip misogyny and racism hold over America. Today, amid a resurgence of hate speech and violence, the work of transforming our broken systems is more urgent than ever. It is imperative that we maintain the momentum of the last few years, trusting our grantees and rejecting calls for micromanagement as a form of risk management.

April 13th, 2017|

Expanding Sanctuary: What Makes a City a Sanctuary Now?

Sanctuary as a concept must evolve and be expanded. It can be a call that unites broad swaths of institutions and civil society if it is based in the belief that collective protection should extend to all communities facing criminalization and persecution and defend against all the agencies that threaten us.

March 14th, 2017|

8 Lessons from Our Southern Grantees in the Fight for Equity and Justice

[The LGBTQ Racial Justice Fund] focuses on the South because of the many powerful multi-issue organizations poised to make an impact on racial justice and LGBTQ rights there and because of how under-resourced the region is philanthropically. And, as Southern racial justice and LGBTQ rights organizers are pointing out to us now, they know how to fight against right-wing repression. We have been listening carefully to our cohort of brilliant and brave movement-building grantees, and I’m eager to share that we’ve heard.

March 13th, 2017|

Our cynicism will not build a movement. Collaboration will.

No one is safe from the transition this country is undergoing. The period that we have entered is unlike anything that any of us has ever seen before. We will need to build a movement across divides of class, race, gender, age, documentation, religion and disability. Building a movement requires reaching out beyond the people who agree with you. Simply said, we need each other, and we need leadership and strategy.

March 13th, 2017|
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