PHILANTHROPY TAKES A STAND

For Philanthropy, Time to Double Down to End Injustice

Foundations and other nonprofits are grappling with the consequences of change for our collective future, especially as we have witnessed how deep a grip misogyny and racism hold over America. Today, amid a resurgence of hate speech and violence, the work of transforming our broken systems is more urgent than ever. It is imperative that we maintain the momentum of the last few years, trusting our grantees and rejecting calls for micromanagement as a form of risk management.

No more fake budgets?! Exploring Equity-Based Approaches to Financial Review

By Iris Garcia, Grants Manager at Akonadi Foundation

Over the past 17 years, Akonadi Foundation has been seeking out ways to align their internal systems and practices with their racial justice values. Adopting Financial Health Indicators as a tool helped Akonadi Foundation be in conversation with grantees about their financial goals and reduce grantee burden in the grantmaking process. This article explains how this transition embodies Akonadi Foundation's values.

HIV is not a crime! (except in 32 states and 72 countries)

By John Barnes, Executive Director, Funders Concerned About AIDS (FCAA)

HIV is a crime in 32 US states and 72 countries around the world. Ironically, the only defense against many of these laws is not knowing your HIV status. Most people with HIV are unaware of their level of vulnerability to criminal charges, and, due to a lack of funding to address these challenges, combatting HIV criminalization is not high on many advocates agendas. A key theme in recent HIV-related philanthropy addressing criminalization includes advocacy and capacity building for impacted populations.

8 Lessons from Our Southern Grantees in the Fight for Equity and Justice

[The LGBTQ Racial Justice Fund] focuses on the South because of the many powerful multi-issue organizations poised to make an impact on racial justice and LGBTQ rights there and because of how under-resourced the region is philanthropically. And, as Southern racial justice and LGBTQ rights organizers are pointing out to us now, they know how to fight against right-wing repression. We have been listening carefully to our cohort of brilliant and brave movement-building grantees, and I’m eager to share that we’ve heard.

Foundation for Louisiana Supports Baton Rouge Organizing with Rapid Response Fund

Foundation for Louisiana (FFL) stands in solidarity with the Baton Rouge community and people across Louisiana and across the nation who are outraged, hurt and engaged by the fatal shootings of Alton Sterling, Deputy Brad Garafola with East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office and officers Matthew Gerald and Montrell Jackson of the Baton Rouge Police Department — as well as the three other injured police officers.

Enough

Headwaters Foundation for Justice mourns the death of Philando Castile, who was shot and killed during a traffic stop by a St. Anthony police officer. And we cry, “enough.”

A Message From FFJ Leadership: In Solidarity With Chicago & Minneapolis

While the shooting in Minneapolis is in itself an abhorrent act, we see it as part of escalating harassment and violence against social movements and social inclusion. Such a trend of activities are abhorrent but not surprising. What is in fact most concerning is the virtual silence by government institutions and leaders. The failure of government agencies to take action reveals a severe lack of accountability to the people.

Moving Money, Making Change: Funding the Movement for Black Lives

As a professional grantmaker, grassroots philanthropist and lifelong activist, it was a privilege to be in this intergenerational space filled with Black families, movement elders, high school activists, young nonprofit leaders, formerly incarcerated people, differently abled participants, fellow funders and old and new friends...Many still hesitate to support the organizers and activists at the heart of the movement. Funders looking to do more should consider three things.