One year after Eric Garner’s death, we still are not safe

Dante Barry, Million Hoodies Movement. The response to this growing movement has been anemic. Task forces were formed and body cameras funded, but conversations in the halls of power have focused exclusively on tweaking, not truly reforming policing practices. New York has a lot of work to do to bring real systemic change to the NYPD.

#SayHerName: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women

Say Her Name responds to increasing calls for attention to police violence against Black women by offering a resource to help ensure that Black women’s stories are integrated into demands for justice, policy responses to police violence, and media representations of victims and survivors of police brutality.

As We Mourn Charleston’s Victims, Philanthropy Must Act

By Nakisha M. Lewis, Tynesha McHarris, and Allen Kwabena Frimpong. But the systemic changes needed to end the violence won’t happen unless this movement gets the resources to build an infrastructure that harnesses a strong network of organizers and organizations.

The Real Crime: Mass Criminalization of our Communities

Everyday, people of color in the United States are being criminalized for their economic condition, their race, their migrant status, gender and so much more. However, the real crime is demonizing, criminalizing and imprisoning millions of young men and women, relegating them to the margins of society as disenfranchised, unemployable pariahs.

A Chance to Rewrite America’s Racial Narrative

Allison Brown, Open Society Foundations: On Mother’s Day, I watch Samaria Rice beg for some closure five months after her son, Tamir, was shot to death by police officers within moments of encountering him in a Cleveland park. I think of Gloria Darden and the shock she must have experienced at discovering that her son, Freddie Gray, was killed so senselessly and so violently by police.

‘Our Demand Is Simple: Stop Killing Us’

On the evening of April 25 at the corner of Pratt and Light Streets, in Baltimore’s revitalized downtown district, more than 100 police officers in riot gear stood shoulder to shoulder, shields up. Six officers on horseback fidgeted behind them, staring down at a crowd of about 40, an odd mixture of protesters, journalists and protester-journalists.