What We’ve Gained And Lost Since Stonewall

People can’t get to Laverne Cox or Janet Mock, so instead, they go after a girl walking in a street in her neighborhood at night, just trying to make money to survive. And when the police come, the murderer goes home free of charge, while this trans woman nobody cares about lies dead in the street.

A Decade After Katrina, Can Philanthropy Make Black Lives Matter?

By Nat Chioke Williams. ...[T]he Hill-Snowdon Foundation recently launched the Making Black Lives Matter Initiative, a three-year project that seeks to build the kind of long-term institutional and political power that the black community needs to achieve real racial justice.

CampaignZERO Launched

CampaignZERO presents a comprehensive package of policy reforms to end police violence in America. It encourages people to petition their elected representatives to implement 10 policy solution areas at the local, state, and federal level of government to achieve an America where police do not kill people.

A Ferguson Syllabus: Reading a Movement

by Darnell Moore. Here are some essential readings from several astute activists, journalists and writers that have inspired, angered and challenged readers everywhere this past year. While this is in no way an exhaustive list, the following offers insider and outsider views of Ferguson, pushing all of us to consider the radical spirit and collective beauty illuminated in mass mobilized protests.

Black Panther cub on new era of civil action

by Malkia Cyril. Like many thousands of black activists, I waded through the multicultural waters of the last 20 years. Even as black organisers and activists actively built a solidarity movement with other communities of colour, anti-blackness prevailed without an organised counter. Until now.

One year after Eric Garner’s death, we still are not safe

Dante Barry, Million Hoodies Movement. The response to this growing movement has been anemic. Task forces were formed and body cameras funded, but conversations in the halls of power have focused exclusively on tweaking, not truly reforming policing practices. New York has a lot of work to do to bring real systemic change to the NYPD.

#SayHerName: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women

Say Her Name responds to increasing calls for attention to police violence against Black women by offering a resource to help ensure that Black women’s stories are integrated into demands for justice, policy responses to police violence, and media representations of victims and survivors of police brutality.

As We Mourn Charleston’s Victims, Philanthropy Must Act

By Nakisha M. Lewis, Tynesha McHarris, and Allen Kwabena Frimpong. But the systemic changes needed to end the violence won’t happen unless this movement gets the resources to build an infrastructure that harnesses a strong network of organizers and organizations.

The Real Crime: Mass Criminalization of our Communities

Everyday, people of color in the United States are being criminalized for their economic condition, their race, their migrant status, gender and so much more. However, the real crime is demonizing, criminalizing and imprisoning millions of young men and women, relegating them to the margins of society as disenfranchised, unemployable pariahs.